The Dos and Don'ts of Putting in a Home Sauna
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home sauna do's and dont's

The Dos and Don'ts of Putting in a Home Sauna

The Dos and Don'ts of Putting in a Home Sauna

Home saunas have grown in popularity in recent years, as more and more homeowners are looking to add the benefits of sauna therapy to their home. Saunas have been used for centuries to improve overall health and well-being, and are now available in a variety of styles and sizes to fit any home.

However, before you start planning your home sauna, there are a few things you should keep in mind to ensure that your sauna is both safe and effective.

Do: Choose the Right Size

One of the most important things to consider when planning your home sauna is the size. Saunas come in a variety of sizes, from small, one-person saunas to large, multiple-person saunas. It's important to choose a size that will comfortably fit the number of people who will be using the sauna, as well as the space you have available in your home.

Do: Consider the Heating Element

Another important consideration when planning your home sauna is the heating element. There are several different types of heating elements available, including electric, gas, and wood-burning. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it's important to choose the one that best fits your needs and budget.

Do: Use High-Quality Materials

When building your home sauna, it's important to use high-quality materials to ensure that it will last for many years. Look for sauna kits that use durable woods, such as cedar or redwood, and make sure that the hardware and accessories are of good quality as well.

Don't: Skimp on Insulation

Insulation is critical to the performance and safety of your home sauna. Make sure that the sauna is well insulated to keep the heat inside and prevent fire hazards.

Don't: Forget Ventilation

Proper ventilation is essential for the safety and comfort of your home sauna. Make sure that the sauna has adequate ventilation to allow for fresh air to circulate and prevent overheating.

Don't: Ignore Local Building Codes

Before you start building your home sauna, make sure that you are aware of and comply with any local building codes and regulations. Failure to do so could result in fines or even legal action.

Codes | OSFM

In conclusion

When installed and used properly, a home sauna can provide many health benefits, as well as being a source of relaxation and enjoyment. By following the dos and don'ts outlined above, you can ensure that your home sauna is both safe and effective.

FAQs

What should you not do in a sauna?

It is generally not recommended to engage in activities that may cause excessive sweating, such as exercising, in a sauna. Additionally, it is important to avoid drinking alcohol or consuming drugs before or during use, as they can cause dehydration and increase the risk of overheating.

Where should a home sauna be placed?

A home sauna should be placed in an area with good ventilation and away from any potential sources of water or moisture. It is also important to ensure that the space has adequate electrical wiring and circuit capacity to support the sauna.

Is it safe to have a sauna in your house?

Yes, it is safe to have a sauna in your house as long as it is installed and used properly. However, it is important to consult with a qualified electrician to ensure that the electrical wiring and circuit capacity can support the sauna, and to ensure that the sauna is installed in accordance with local building codes.

What do you put under an indoor sauna?

An indoor sauna should be placed on a level, solid surface, such as a concrete slab or tile floor. It is also important to ensure that the sauna is properly insulated to prevent heat loss.

Do home saunas use a lot of electricity?

The amount of electricity used by a home sauna will vary depending on the size and type of sauna, as well as how often it is used. However, it is generally not considered a significant source of electricity consumption.

What is the first thing you do in a sauna?

The first thing you should do before entering a sauna is to shower or clean your body to remove any dirt or sweat. It is also important to hydrate yourself before entering the sauna.

Should I shower right after sauna?

It is recommended to shower after using a sauna in order to remove any sweat and dirt from your body, as well as to cool down gradually.

Do indoor saunas need to be vented?

Indoor saunas typically do not require venting, as they are designed to retain heat. However, it is important to ensure that the sauna has adequate ventilation to prevent excessive humidity and to provide fresh air.

Are saunas a lot of maintenance?

Saunas require minimal maintenance, but it is important to keep the sauna clean and in good working order. This may include regularly cleaning the interior and ensuring that the electrical components are functioning properly.

Do home saunas need a drain?

Home saunas do not typically require a drain, but it is important to ensure that the flooring material is able to withstand high temperatures and humidity.

Additionally, it is important to note that it's always good to read the manual or consult with the manufacturer regarding proper usage, installation and maintenance of the sauna.

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